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By American Academy of Neurology
Researchers may have identified key genes linked to why some people have a higher tolerance for pain than others, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia,...

By American Academy of Neurology
Older people who have apathy but not depression may have smaller brain volumes than those without apathy, according to a new study published in the April 16, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

By American Academy of Neurology
People who develop diabetes and high blood pressure in middle age are more likely to have brain cell loss and other damage to the brain, as well as problems with memory and thinking skills, than people who never have diabetes or high blood pressure or...

By American Academy of Neurology
Mayor Proclaims Brain Health Awareness Day as World-class Neurologists Arrive to Educate Philly’s Patients and Families

By American Academy of Neurology
PHILADELPHIA – A new study finds that football helmets currently used on the field may do little to protect against hits to the side of the head, or rotational force, an often dangerous source of brain injury and encephalopathy.

By American Academy of Neurology
Eating foods that contain vitamin C may reduce your risk of the most common type of hemorrhagic stroke, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 66thAnnual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to...

By American Academy of Neurology
What: Registration is now open to journalists planning to attend the American Academy of Neurology’s (AAN) 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014.

By American Academy of Neurology
Study Finds Moderate Drinking May Not Harm Memory and Executive Function

By American Academy of Neurology
Deep brain stimulation may have a beneficial effect on driving ability for people with Parkinson’s disease, according to a new study published in the December 18, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of...

By American Academy of Neurology
Michael J. Fox Urges Patient Research Participation in Free DVD and Guidebook

By American Academy of Neurology
In the largest study on the topic to date, research shows that speaking a second language may delay the onset of three types of dementias.

By American Academy of Neurology
The American Academy of Neurology has selected 30 neurologists from around the world to attend the prestigious Donald M. Palatucci Advocacy Leadership Forum, January 30-February 2, 2014, in San Diego, Calif.

By American Academy of Neurology
The American Brain Foundation, the foundation for the American Academy of Neurology, is accepting video entries to its 2014 Neuro Film Festival.

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – Even for elderly people with no signs of dementia, those with hardening of the arteries are more likely to also have the beta-amyloid plaques in the brain that are a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study published in the...

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – Contrary to earlier studies, new research suggests that omega-3 fatty acids may not benefit thinking skills.

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – New evidence suggests that taking vitamin B supplements may help reduce the risk of stroke. The research appears in the September 18, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

By American Academy of Neurology
New research suggests that men who exercise vigorously as young adults may reduce their risk of developing epilepsy later in life.

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – Studies show that migraine is more common among people with lower incomes.

By American Academy of Neurology
Drinking two cups of hot chocolate a day may help older people keep their brains healthy and their thinking skills sharp, according to a study published in the August 7, 2013, online issue of Neurology®.

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – A new study suggests that Chinese people may be at higher risk for stroke than Caucasians. The research is published in the July 16, 2013, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

All Press Releases

By American Academy of Neurology
Researchers may have identified key genes linked to why some people have a higher tolerance for pain than others, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia,...

By American Academy of Neurology
Older people who have apathy but not depression may have smaller brain volumes than those without apathy, according to a new study published in the April 16, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

By American Academy of Neurology
Older people who are starting to have memory and thinking problems, but do not yet have dementia, may have a lower risk of dying from cancer than people who have no memory and thinking problems, according to a study published in the April 9, 2014, online.

By American Academy of Neurology
Young adults who run or participate in other cardio fitness activities may preserve their memory and thinking skills in middle age, according to a new study published in the April 2, 2014, online issue ofNeurology®, the medical journal of the American...

By American Academy of Neurology
People who develop diabetes and high blood pressure in middle age are more likely to have brain cell loss and other damage to the brain, as well as problems with memory and thinking skills, than people who never have diabetes or high blood pressure or...

By American Academy of Neurology
Mayor Proclaims Brain Health Awareness Day as World-class Neurologists Arrive to Educate Philly’s Patients and Families

By American Academy of Neurology
PHILADELPHIA – A new study finds that football helmets currently used on the field may do little to protect against hits to the side of the head, or rotational force, an often dangerous source of brain injury and encephalopathy.

By American Academy of Neurology
Eating foods that contain vitamin C may reduce your risk of the most common type of hemorrhagic stroke, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 66thAnnual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to...

By American Academy of Neurology
What: Registration is now open to journalists planning to attend the American Academy of Neurology’s (AAN) 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014.

By American Academy of Neurology
Study Finds Moderate Drinking May Not Harm Memory and Executive Function

By American Academy of Neurology
A new study finds that the epilepsy drug levetiracetam appears not to be associated with thinking, movement and language problems for preschool children born to mothers who took the drug during pregnancy, although the drug valproate was associated with...

By American Academy of Neurology
Deep brain stimulation may have a beneficial effect on driving ability for people with Parkinson’s disease, according to a new study published in the December 18, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of...

By American Academy of Neurology
Michael J. Fox Urges Patient Research Participation in Free DVD and Guidebook

By American Academy of Neurology
Study: Single Season of Hits Connected to Brain, Memory and Thinking Changes

By American Academy of Neurology
A vaccine used to prevent tuberculosis in other parts of the world may help prevent multiple sclerosis (MS) in people who show the beginning signs of the disease, according to a new study published in the December 4, 2013, online issue of Neurology®,...

By American Academy of Neurology
After a mild concussion, special brain scans show evidence of brain abnormalities four months later, when symptoms from the concussion have mostly dissipated, according to research published in the November 20, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the...

By American Academy of Neurology
People in middle age who have a high blood pressure measure called pulse pressure are more likely to have biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease in their spinal fluid than those with lower pulse pressure, according to research published in the November 13,...

By American Academy of Neurology
In the largest study on the topic to date, research shows that speaking a second language may delay the onset of three types of dementias.

By American Academy of Neurology
The American Academy of Neurology has selected 30 neurologists from around the world to attend the prestigious Donald M. Palatucci Advocacy Leadership Forum, January 30-February 2, 2014, in San Diego, Calif.

By American Academy of Neurology
Measuring the time it takes a person with multiple sclerosis(MS) to walk 25 feet may provide a clear picture of the progression of the disease, along with the severity of disability, according to a study published in the October 30, 2013, online issue of.

By American Academy of Neurology
Even for people who don’t have diabetes or high blood sugar, those with higher blood sugar levels are more likely to have memory problems, according to a new study published in the October 23, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of...

By American Academy of Neurology
The American Brain Foundation, the foundation for the American Academy of Neurology, is accepting video entries to its 2014 Neuro Film Festival.

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – Even for elderly people with no signs of dementia, those with hardening of the arteries are more likely to also have the beta-amyloid plaques in the brain that are a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study published in the...

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – Stroke treatments and prevention to improve quality of life for people who experience a stroke is poorer than researchers hoped, with stroke still taking nearly three out of five quality years off a person’s life, according to a new...

By American Academy of Neurology
People who are depressed may have triple the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, according to a study published in the October 2, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – Contrary to earlier studies, new research suggests that omega-3 fatty acids may not benefit thinking skills.

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – New evidence suggests that taking vitamin B supplements may help reduce the risk of stroke. The research appears in the September 18, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

By American Academy of Neurology
People who get occasional migraines are more likely to be obese than people who do not have migraines, according to a study published in the September 11, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

By American Academy of Neurology
New research suggests that men who exercise vigorously as young adults may reduce their risk of developing epilepsy later in life.

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – Studies show that migraine is more common among people with lower incomes.

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – A new study suggests that simple tests that measure the ability to recognize and name famous people such as Albert Einstein, Bill Gates or Oprah Winfrey may help doctors identify early dementia in those 40 to 65 years of age.

By American Academy of Neurology
Drinking two cups of hot chocolate a day may help older people keep their brains healthy and their thinking skills sharp, according to a study published in the August 7, 2013, online issue of Neurology®.

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – Anemia, or low levels of red blood cells, may increase the risk of dementia, according to a study published in the July 31, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – People who stop taking cholesterol drugs may be at an increased risk for developing Parkinson’s disease, according to research that appears in the July 24, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the...

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – A new study suggests that Chinese people may be at higher risk for stroke than Caucasians. The research is published in the July 16, 2013, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – Older people with Alzheimer’s disease are less likely to also have cancer, and older people with cancer are less likely to also have Alzheimer’s disease, according to the largest study to date on the topic, which appears...

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – People who have a traumatic brain injury (TBI) may be more likely to have a future stroke, according to research that appears in the June 26, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – People who experience any stroke symptoms—but do not have a stroke—may also be more likely to develop problems with memory and thinking, according to new research published in the June 19, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the...

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – Men who experience restless legs syndrome (RLS) may have a higher risk of dying earlier, according to research that appears in the June 12, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – People who develop a type of irregular heartbeat common in old age called atrial fibrillation may also be more likely to develop problems with memory and thinking, according to new research published in the June 5, 2013, online issue of...

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – A new guideline from the American Academy of Neurology will help people who take blood thinners decide whether or not to take them during surgery or other medical procedures.

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – A large analysis of more than 100 studies from around the world shows that exposure to pesticides, or bug and weed killers, and solvents is likely associated with a higher risk of developing Parkinson’s disease.

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – Older people with a history of migraines and depression may have smaller brain tissue volumes than people with only one or neither of the conditions, according to a new study in the May 22, 2013, online issue of Neurology®...

By American Academy of Neurology
People who have skin cancer may be less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease, according to new research published in the May 15, 2013, online issue of Neurology®.

By American Academy of Neurology
Television actor and “Dancing with the Stars” winner John O’Hurley is the host of Epilepsy: A Guide for Patients and Families, the latest free patient education DVD and guidebook produced by the AAN.

By American Academy of Neurology
The largest study to date finds that eating foods that contain omega-3 fatty acids, found in fish, chicken and salad dressing and avoiding saturated fats, meat and dairy foods may be linked to preserving memory and thinking abilities.

By American Academy of Neurology
MINNEAPOLIS – The teenage years may be a key period of vulnerability related to living in the “stroke belt” when it comes to future stroke risk, according to a new study published in the April 24, 2013, online issue of Neurology®.

By American Academy of Neurology
The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) has released an evidence-based guideline on treating neurocysticercosis, a tapeworm infection causing seizures that is common in developing countries and is now on the rise in developed...

By American Academy of Neurology
The virus that causes cold sores, along with other viral or bacterial infections, may be associated with cognitive problems, according to a new study published in the March 26, 2013, print issue of...

By American Academy of Neurology
People with multiple sclerosis (MS) who have cognitive problems, or problems with memory, attention, and concentration, have more damage to areas of the brain involved in cognitive processes than people with MS who do not have cognitive problems.



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